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National Asthma Council Australia are hoping to bust many myths on World Asthma Day

Photo: Breathe better on World Asthma Day
National Asthma Council Australia is busting myths about the condition on Tuesday - World Asthma Day.

People over 65 shouldn't mistake asthma for emphysema, and late onset isn't uncommon.

It's just one of the many myths the National Asthma Council Australia are hoping to bust on World Asthma Day.

They want Australians to take control of their asthma and allergies by learning how to better manage and prevent flare ups.

The first step is visiting their doctor for a check-up.

"As we near cold and flu season people with asthma can be hit particularly hard as symptoms like wheezing, shortness of breath, and coughing become exacerbated, and the risk of a flare-up increases - so it's crucial to protect yourself by getting an annual flu vaccine," according to National Asthma Council Asthma and Respiratory Educator Marg Gordon.
With at least one person dying each day in Australia as a result of their asthma, despite the majority of these deaths being preventable, it's imperative that those with asthma arm themselves with the knowledge and tools they need to breathe better.

Top five questions asked by patients about asthma:

- Spacers, do adults and children need them? Yes. They are beneficial for all.

- I've got asthma and I'm pregnant; should I avoid or stop taking my asthma medication? No, don't stop taking them as many women find their asthma changes during pregnancy.

- I take medications for allergic rhinitis related to my asthma. Should I try complementary therapies? If there is insufficient evidence, the complementary therapy is not recommended.

- I'm over 65. How can I tell if it's really asthma or if it's emphysema? Some people develop asthma for the first time in later adulthood. Discuss breathing problems with your doctor.

Is there a connection between fragranced consumer products and asthma? People who have asthma can have a variety of triggers so fragrances may affect some people and make their asthma symptoms worse.

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