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Research shows NSW cancer survival rate on the rise

Photo: NSW cancer survival rate on the rise
Despite a drop in cancer mortality rates in NSW an estimated 15,000 people will still lose their lives to the disease in 2018, the state's latest data reveals.

More than 15,000 people are expected to die from cancer in NSW this year - but the rate of survival is improving for most forms of the disease, research shows.

The state's latest report card on cancer, published on Tuesday, has revealed a drop in the mortality rate over the past four years.

And while the number of people being told they have cancer will increase as population grows, the rate of people dying is predicted to keep falling.

It's estimated 46,000 people in NSW will be diagnosed with a form of the disease in 2018, while more than 15,000 are expected to die.
Lung cancer was one of most deadly and most common cancers in NSW in 2013.

Cancer Institute NSW's chief executive David Currow said the ability to control cancer remained an issue, state authorities were moving in the right direction.

"Fewer people are smoking, more people are participating in cancer screening programs, more people are accessing world class cancer treatment and more people are participating in clinical trials," he said in a statement.

"Importantly, survival is improving for most cancers."

CANCER IN NSW

* An estimated 46,112 new cases of cancer will be diagnosed in 2018, while 15,459 people are expected to die from the disease.

* The mortality rate is expected to fall from 150.1 for every 100,000 people in 2018 to 142.2 by 2021.

* The number of people taking part in free cancer screening programs has increased across the state.

* The number of cancer clinical trials in NSW increased by 18 per cent between 2015 and 2017.

* The five most common cancers in NSW were breast, bowel, prostate, lung and melanoma.

(Source: Cancer Institute NSW)

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